Aug 04 / Simcha

Understanding Addiction (G. Maté)

Unlike other treatment professionals, Canadian physician and social critic Gabor Maté disagrees with the current biomedical, genetic model of addiction. He insists that addictive patterns of behavior are rooted in the alienation and emotional suffering that are inseparable from Western capitalist cultures, which (by favoring striving and acquiring over noticing and caring for one another), end up shortchanging — and too often traumatizing — children and families.

Read more

Jul 19 / Simcha

The Need to be Right (R. Solley)

California couples therapist Dr. Robert Solley writes about the need to be right as a significant single predictor of relationship failure.

When differences become contests of right and wrong, he writes, the essential feelings of safety and comfort that we seek in relationship get replaced with feelings of helplessness, mistrust, inadequacy and pain.

Read more

Jun 14 / Simcha

Part 2: The Art of Reconnecting (T. Real)

Part 2:  The Art of Reconnecting

The skills we need to “work the relationship” by “working ourselves” inside the relationship are different from qualities prized in the “intervention from above” model — being right, being powerful. That flies out the window when we begin to think relationally.

Read more

May 15 / Simcha

7 Verbs . . . Better Loving (E. Perel)

Relationship and sex therapist Esther Perel notes that, much as one must be able to conjugate certain core verbs in order to speak a language, one must similarly practice seven basic relational verbs to sustain a satisfying friendship or relationship.  In the bedroom, practicing these verbs becomes even more significant.

Read more

May 01 / Simcha

Successful Couples Therapy

So many couples wish that the repair work might be done for them. They come into couples therapy hoping the therapist will quickly notice how very (very!) wrong their partner is in every way, how responsible that partner is for all the damage, distrust and ill will.

Read more

Apr 28 / Simcha

Great Betrayals  (A. Fels)

       Image credit: Anthony Russo

In her New York Times article, Great Betrayals (10.05.13), New York psychiatrist Dr. Anna Fels writes eloquently about the corrosive, confusing and life-altering impact of betrayal and deceit in a marriage.

She describes how lies eat away at the fabric of the betrayed partner’s past reality, creating the need — in order to move forward — for a new narrative that integrates both the good and the bad.  The following is a selection from her longer article.

Read more